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IJBPS Table of Content: February 2015 3(1)

Research Paper

 

Juan-S. León-Lleras and Alberto Acosta.  pp. 1 - 19

BIRD ASSEMBLAGE COMPARISON IN SMALL FRAGMENTS OF DIFFERENT SHAPE AND SIZE

 

           

Little has been published on a small-scale (x < 100 ha) about the independent impact of the shape and size of fragments on community structure of any biological group. Only studies in large scale, in temperate ecosystems, have been performed. Here, the bird community structure was assessed in small High-Andean tropical forest fragments (x < 100 ha). Through direct observation using belt transects we compare bird composition, density, richness and diversity between fragments of three different sizes (10.1 ha < x < 100 ha, 1.1 ha < x < 10 ha and x < 1 ha) and two shapes (polygonal and elliptical). We found that density values differed significatively when comparing shape and size, been higher in smaller and elliptical fragments. Bird richness, Shannon, Fisher-alpha and dominance indexes differed regarding size but not fragment shape. Bird composition changed with fragment shape but not with size. The results coincide with studies conducted in larger fragments (over 1000 ha) in which, bird community composition, density and diversity may be responding to both, fragment shape and size. This emerging pattern observed for birds in the High-Andean forest at small scale should be confirmed experimentally as well as replied in other biological groups and tropical ecosystems.

Keywords: Fragmentation; shape; size; assemblage; bird communities; urban ecosystem; High-Andean forest; Colombia.


Manjula Wijesundara.  pp. 20 - 26

A STUDY OF THE AVIFAUNA IN A RURAL AGRICULTURAL AREA IN KANDY DISTRICT, SRI LANKA

 

           

Birds, undoubtedly, are the most fascinating forms of terrestrial life on Earth for the majority of humans. Even the prehistoric man, apparently, was amused by the birds, as is evidenced by the cave paintings of Cro-Magnon men in Altamira in Spain and Lascaux in France (Gooders, 1990). Birds are also depicted in the rock paintings of Australian aborigines (Baran & Martin, 2005) and Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert in South Africa. Avifauna of Sri Lanka is spectacularly diverse, with no less than 450 species on record as at present (including vagrants). Of these, some 237 species are breeding residents and the rest are migrants (species that come to Sri Lanka in search of mild climes during the northern winter).

Keywords: Birds, Sri Lanka, Avifuana.